If you pay attention to the media reports about OxyContin addiction, you may assume the prescription pain medication is only abused by the rich and famous. This form of ‘Hollywood high” has been connected to numerous celebrities over the last decade, including Heath Ledger, Michael Jackson, Courtney Love and Rush Limbaugh. While these public figures generate headlines, the OxyContin crisis isn’t decided by one’s bank account or star rating.

Stories about well-known entertainers abusing OxyContin may be connected to the cost of obtaining the drug, which is often sold at $20 to $40 per pill. Maintaining an expensive drug habit is easier to do when your income is at a rock star level, but the high price doesn’t give name talent a membership in some exclusive club. OxyContin isn’t that selective about who becomes addicted and who does not.

You might call OxyContin, which many users compare to the high of heroin, an equal opportunity drug. Anyone using or abusing this strong opiate faces the potential of addiction. Small doses become tolerated over time leading to use of larger doses and the onset of physical dependence. A paver will respond to the drug the same way as a pop singer. A tour guide is no different than a talk show host.

Addiction specialists treating OxyContin abuse also don’t distinguish between the influential and everyone else. A Hollywood star—who can afford to spend thousands of dollars a week to have the drug delivered to his home—may find rehab more affordable than the blue-collar worker or business professional, but all of them face the same responsibilities in kicking the habit, whether they started using OxyContin for legitimate pain relief or turned to the drug as a way to cope with emotional circumstances. Withdrawal symptoms experienced by abusers, from vomiting to insomnia, will overwhelm each one of them.

Finding an effective treatment program to respond to OxyContin addiction can be equally difficult for the high-powered and the humble. The drug itself is so addictive that users seeking short-term treatment may return to the habit soon after. This may lead to a chronic relapse in which the abuser fails to successfully remove the grip of the drug. It may also lead to criminal behavior where securing doses of the drug involve tricking doctors, buying it from black market dealers or stealing OxyContin.

You may not be acquainted with Hollywood elite, but the pervasive abuse of OxyContin means you may know a coworker, friend of family member who is quietly growing addicted to the drug. Long-term treatment is available for OxyContin abusers who are struggling to break free of its hold. Dealing with OxyContin addiction is one of the specialties of Burning Tree, a long term drug and alcohol rehabilitation facility in Texas. Burning Tree hosts facilities outside of Dallas and Austin, serving individuals from all 50 states in their quest to safely and effectively respond to addiction and change their relationship with unhealthy and dangerous choices. Visit  www.burningtree.com or contact us at 866-287-2877.